How to Make Your Wedding Week Schedule

A table at a party set with drinks and a sign above that says "Brunch and Bubbly"

While most couples know that having a schedule for the wedding itself is a good idea, it’s also not the worst idea to make some detailed schedules for the whole week. Everything in the lead-up to the wedding will be done with a combination of excited emotions and many, many well-wishers, so being able to refer to that schedule can be a real help to staying on track and not wasting time. Here are some sections of a wedding week schedule that you might find useful as you plan for your own big day.

Make Sure You’re Prepared for Guest Arrivals

If you want anything to be ready when people arrive at homes or hotels, schedule a time to get it into position early, whether it’s something as necessary as a sturdy handrail for older family coming up steps or welcome baskets delivered to hotel rooms. Such ideas can be fun when the wedding is months away, but they need a specific moment to be done. If possible, schedule time with one or two nearby bridesmaids for a week before to make sure you aren’t assembling gifts or activity suggestions for travelers a week before the big day.

Plan for the Informal Moments

A woman enjoying a walk in a field.

It’s good to figure out what you and your guests will be doing within the lead-up to the big day when you’re not at pre-wedding events or finishing last-minute craft projects or tasks. Make a plan for the time between when everyone arrives and the first official wedding event. Even if you know some guests will have their own activities planned, you can be a good host by providing a list of local activites and sites to see should anyone be arriving a day or two before the wedding itself.

Also think about what you want to do as well: would a pedicure with your sister make you happiest? Do you need to plan time for a nice long run or yoga session to calm your nerves? Make sure you schedule in self-care because other activities may crowd it out otherwise.

Focus on Key Transitions for the Day-Of

Often this part of the schedule is handled by a wedding planner, but for your own sanity it might be nice to have a copy yourself. The biggest key in this schedule is for the people who are responsible for each transition, such as the bride walking down the aisle or the announcement that the cake is being cut. If you don’t have a planner, make sure everyone knows their personal cues to keep things moving at the pace you desire.

Don’t Forget About Rehearsal Details

A rehearsal dinner party.

Rather than starting your schedule with the rehearsal itself, schedule all the things you’ll need to prepare for it, including transportation for everyone involved, maps and/or directions for getting from the ceremony venue to the restuarant, and transportaiton for any physical items that need to be on hand for the rehearsal and dinner. Make a plan for when you intend to slip out to make sure you get some shut-eye before the big day, too.

Leave the Day-Of Schedule with a Trusted Friend

For afternoon and evening weddings, the morning of a wedding can look very different: some people are busy decorating their venue while others can do that on a previous day, and many last-minute tasks may start to pile up. Having a good schedule will help you make sure that every item is assigned to a willing volunteer and gets checked off the list. Having a trusty friend hold on to the list while you are pulled in many directions is a great idea.

By making sure that your wedding week is scheduled, you are actually more free to enjoy your experiences with friends, family, and your fiance, knowing that you aren’t forgetting anything and everything will happen in good time.

The post How to Make Your Wedding Week Schedule appeared first on Weddingbee.